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VISIBLE women

Current Campaigns and Success Stories

Since 2016 when this campaign for equality started, attitudes to women’s contributions to society are finally changing both in the UK and worldwide. There is an uprising of campaigns for statues of the many wonderful women previously overlooked and excluded from the historical record.

In this VISIBLEWomen page, some of the Current Campaigns are followed by the Success Stories reaching right back to the 1800s. Please feel free to add statues you see, or details of a campaign using the links below.

Statue by Marc Quin of activist Jen Reid on plinth where the slave trader Colston’s statue had stood, Bristol 2020.  Photo: Epigram Emma Fernandez Schmidt.

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visible Women UK

Current Campaigns

Working with VISIBLEWomenUK

Virginia Woolf

Possible Statue Site:
Richmond-on-Thames

We’ve launched a campaign to commission, fund and erect a statue of Virginia Woolf in Richmond-on-Thames where she lived with her husband Leonard from 1914 to 1924. Virginia developed as a writer there and wrote short stories, essays, reviews and novels while living in Richmond. She worked with Leonard, her husband, to set up the Hogarth Press in Richmond publishing works by T.S. Eliot, Katherine Mansfield and Sigmund Freud among many others.

This statue will be the first ever full figure life-size bronze depiction of Virginia Woolf. The target is £50,000.

https://www.aurorametro.org/virginia-woolf-statue

Lady Rhondda

Possible Statue Site:
Newport, Gwent

Contact:
Julie Nicholas: julie.nicholas151@gmail.com

Lady Rhondda was a Welsh suffragette, business leader, founder & editor of the important interwar periodical 'Time & Tide, life long feminist activist and the first woman to try to take a seat in the House of Lords. Statue for Lady Rhondda is part of the Monumental Welsh Women campaign to unveil 5 statues of named Welshwomen in Wales.

https://monumentalwelshwomen.com/

Sylvia Pankhurst

Possible Statue Site:
Clerkenwell Green, Islington, London

Contact:
Megan Dobney: megan@gn.apc.org

Sylvia Pankhurst
Socialist, internationalist, anti-racist
The idea for a statue of Sylvia Pankhurst was born in 1988 (gasp!) when one of the now four-woman committee was near the House of Lords by the memorial to Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. No mention of Sylvia…
Sylvia is the one who truly frightens the horses.
Expelled from the Women’s Social and Political Union by her mother and sister, Sylvia was working in the impoverished East End of London with women and children, with trade unions, and, the final straw, supporting Irish socialists James Connolly and Jim FOLLOW THE LINK FOR THE REST OF THE STORY

http://sylviapankhurst.gn.apc.org/

Friends of the Factories

Possible Statue Site:
Derry/ Londonderry

Contact:
Yvonne Norris/ Clare Moore: friendsofthefactories@aol.com

Friends of the Factories is a grassroots group est. in 2019 -uniting the voices of former Shirt Factory Workers from the City of Derry/Londonderry and beyond. We celebrate & acknowledge the Shirt Factory Workers contribution to the unique social, economic, and cultural identity of the City. The shirt-making industry left a significant cultural & architectural legacy in the city & surrounding areas. The mostly female workforce of the factories has gained a legendary reputation for keeping the economy going even in the darkest days of the Troubles of N.Ireland. We aim to continue to raise awareness and honour their contribution, in the absence of the promised public artwork over 18 years ago.

https://www.friendsofthefactories.com/

The Matchgirls Memorial

Possible Statue Site:
Borough of Tower Hamlets, London

Contact:
Sam Johnson: matchgirls1888statue@gmail.com

The Matchgirls Memorial is a charitable organisation established primarily to raise awareness about the Matchgirls Strike of 1888 at the Bryant and May factory in Bow, East London, and to erect a statue in the East End to celebrate the bravery of the Matchgirls. The victorious Strike paved the way for the new labour movement and new unionism, and its legacy is still very relevant today. The courage and sheer determination of the Matchgirls is an inspiration for many still battling for fair and equal working rights.

https://www.matchgirls1888.org/

Mary Clarke Statue Appeal

Possible Statue Site:
Brighton Pavilion Gardens or close by.

Contact:
Jean Calder: jeancalder.mcsa@gmail.com

Mary Clarke was the first suffragette to die for the cause of women's suffrage. Sister of Emmeline Pankhurst and an organiser for the Women's Social and Political Union in Brighton from 1909 - 1910. She had escaped an abusive marriage then dedicated herself to the struggle for women's suffrage. She was injured in the notorious violence of "Black Friday" in November 1910, imprisoned for one month and forcibly fed during a hunger strike. Mary died of a brain haemorrhage on Christmas day 1910, 2 days after her release from prison. There is no public memorial to her anywhere in the country. Despite the hardships she suffered, she said " I am glad to pay the price for freedom "

https://maryclarkestatue.com

Mary on the Toon

Possible Statue Site:
City centre, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Contact:
Claudine van Hensbergen: claudine.vanhensbergen@northumbria.ac.uk

We're gathering momentum to launch a statue campaign for 'the first English feminist', Newcastle's own Mary Astell (1666-1731).

Astell was a philosopher and much published author who took on the major thinkers of her day. Not least, she argued that society needed to rethink the position of women, and she proposed solutions that would provide women with access to education and alternative life options to getting married. Some three hundred years ago, she advanced ideas and beliefs that many people in modern Britain hold today. We believe it’s time to recognise her groundbreaking courage and intelligence in arguing for a fairer and more equal society.

https://maryastellstatue.co.uk/

Dr Elsie Inglis

Possible Statue Site:
219 High Street in Royal Mile, Edinburgh

Contact:
Alison Collington: collingtona@outlook.com

Dr Elsie Inglis (1864-1917) was an early pioneering Scottish physician and surgeon. In 1894 Elsie set up her own medical practice and a hospice for women in Edinburgh. She was an ardent Suffragist and campaigner for women’s medical education.

In 1914 she defied the War Office after being told ‘Go home and sit still’ and founded the Scottish Women’s Hospitals for Foreign Service, sending qualified teams of female doctors and nurses, auxiliaries and drivers to 11 countries including France, Serbia and Russia helping thousands of soldiers and civilians who were caught up in the horror of war.

https://www.elsieinglis.org

Success Stories

Become part of this band of increasingly VISIBLE Women UK.

Campaigning really does work. In the five years from 2016 to 2021 improved awareness has resulted in a TENFOLD INCREASE in statues of women in the UK:

1882 to 2015 = 0.6 statues per year
2016 to 2021 = 6 statues per year.

The value, purpose and the quiet persistent power of statues are all now becoming better understood and valued everywhere. Public engagement with the impact of these ever-present symbols is flourishing, which has lead to the questioning, official removal or toppling of those that stood for cruel and abhorrent practices and to the welcome appearance of figures that celebrate public-spirited, kind and clever actions. Needless to say, many of those celebrating these positive values have been of women; women who had systematically been relegated, overlooked and air-brushed out of history. 

It is so heartening to witness the warm welcome for these previously forgotten figures. Since 2016 the pace of change has been astonishing but we still have a lot of ground to make up to achieve equality.

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Success Stories

Mary Anning

Artist:
Denise Dutton

Date erected:
21 May 2022

Place:
Lyme Regis Dorset

Commissioner:
Mary Anning Rocks campaign

Mary Anning, was not only was she an early pioneer of palaeontology, she was a scientist with a huge capacity to understand the fossilised remains she discovered in the Blue Lias cliffs of Lyme Regis. But, because she was from a poor working-class background and struggled for most of her life with poverty she has been forgotten and left out of our history books. Yet without a formal education, her discoveries and ideas about the first ever Ichthyosaurs and Plesiosaurs to be discovered became the catalyst that changed the way we think about the origins of our planet and how life evolved on it. Even now a hundred and seventy one years after her death, books still fail to list her as one of the greatest Palaeontologists of our time. Her name has been eradicated from the annals of history and her achievements unacknowledged and unknown because Anning was an uneducated, working-class woman and, subsequently, an outsider to polite society and the scientific community. Anning lived at a time when women were not allowed to vote, own their own property, or attend university.The influential Geological Society of London did not allow women to join as members, or even allow them to attend meetings or lectures as guests. Even though it was very clear Mary knew more about the fossilised remains she discovered and the geology of Lyme Regis than any of the wealthy clients she collected for, it was always the male geologists who published the scientific descriptions of the specimens she found, frequently neglecting to even make reference to her name.

Fossils that she discovered which are displayed in museums all around the world, still show the names of the wealthy, educated men that bought them from her. Her work was plagiarised then and still continues to be to this today.

https://www.maryanningrocks.co.uk/about-mary-anning

Our Elizabeth

Artist:
Hazel Reeves

Date erected:
8 Mar 2022

Place:
Congleton Cheshire

Commissioner:
Elizabeths Group

She was a lifelong campaigner for women's rights in the UK and the unveiling took place fittingly, on International Women's Day. She is seen here surrounded by sculptor Hazel Reeves and the current-day camapigners who worked so long and hard to make this event a reality. She lived in Congleton from 1867, having previously spent most of her life in several of the villages around what is now Greater Manchester. She fought tirelessly for women's rights, with a particular focus being on girls' education.This had been a point of special importance to Elizabeth, as she and her brother had been afforded vastly unequal levels of education as children, with her brother ultimately becoming a professor of mathematics at Cambridge while Elizabeth was not even permitted a higher education. Despite this lack of formal education, she was dubbed 'the brains od the Suffragist movement " by no less a person than Emmeilne Pankhurst.
https://www.invisiblewomen.org.uk/gettingattention/post/220

Dame Ethel Smyth

Artist:
Christine Charlesworth

Date erected:
8 Mar 2022

Place:
Woking centre

Commissioner:
Woking council

Dame Ethel was famed throughout her life for being the first female composer to receive a Damehood for services to music. She was an active suffragette and had been imprisoned for breaking a window as part of a suffragette protest. She was also an early LGBTQ+ figure, who lived in Hook Heath, Woking, from 1910 until her death in 1944.

Sculptor Christine Charelsworth said: "She was a very confident woman, a very clever woman, very full of energy, and didn't suffer fools gladly, apparently!"
https://www.invisiblewomen.org.uk/gettingattention/post/219

Licoricia

Artist:
Ian Rank-Broadley

Date erected:
10 Feb 2022

Place:
Jewry Street Winchester

Commissioner:
unknown

The medieval Jewish businesswoman was a money lender and single parent in the Hampshire city. She rose from obscurity to become one of the wealthiest women in 13th Century England, providing loans to kings, queens, bishops and the nobility. Her wealth contributed to the building of Westminster Abbey and helped bankroll three English kings, but she was also faced with a rise in anti-Semitism.She was murdered in 1277 but no-one was ever convicted. The statue stands outside The Arc centre in Jewry Street, where Licoricia was known to have lived.
The statue is intended “to act as an inspiration to women of today and also promote tolerance and understanding in our society”. It was to have been unveiled by Prince Charles until he came down with Covid.The statue's plinth has the words from Leviticus 19:18, "Love thy neighbour as thyself", inscribed in both English and Hebrew.

Windrush & Commonwealth NHS Nurses & Midwives,

Artist:
not known

Date erected:
9 Oct 2021

Place:
The Whittington Hospital London

Commissioner:
heritage organisation Nubian Jak, in collaboration with Islington Council and the Whittington Health NHS Trust,

A statue was unveiled in September 2021 in north London to commemorate the efforts of Windrush and Commonwealth NHS nurses and midwives, following a successful crowd-funding campaign. Commissioned by heritage organisation Nubian Jak, in collaboration with Islington Council and the Whittington Health NHS Trust, the monument was unveiled outside of The Whittington Hospital to an audience that included Islington’s mayor councillor Troy Gallagher, the area’s MP Jeremy Corbyn, NHS staff and former nurses and midwives.This granite statue of a women holding a baby finally commemorates the 40,000 Windrush and Commonwealth nurses and midwives who came to the UK between 1948 and 1973 to help the NHS. Without them it would have been very difficult for the NHS to have survived.

Barbara Castle

Artist:
Sam Holland

Date erected:
9 Oct 2021

Place:
Jubilee Square Blackburn

Commissioner:
Blackburn Council

Castle, who died in 2002 aged 91, spearheaded the legislation to promote equal pay for women, as well as the fitting of seat belts in new cars and the introduction of the breathalyser, leading to huge reductions on deaths and injuries.
For more info see https://invisiblewomen.org.uk/gettingattention/post/198

Henrietta Lacks

Artist:
Helen Wilson-Roe

Date erected:
4 Oct 2021

Place:
Outside Royal Fort House in the Bristol campus grounds

Commissioner:
University of Bristol

Henrietta Lacks (1920-1951) was a young Black African American mother, who died from aggressive cervical cancer. Her cancerous cells, the first human ones to live and continue to reproduce outside a body, were known as Hela cells. These cells were harvested for medical research without her or her family’s knowledge or consent, and it was only in 1975 that by chance the family found out about her amazing legacy. This raises ethical issues, but the use of her cells has led to many breakthroughs in medicine such as polio vaccine, improving gene mapping and even research into Covid-19. This life-size bronze statue was sculpted by Helen Wilson-Roe. It is the first statue of a Black woman by a Black woman to be erected permanently in a public space in the UK.
https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/bristol-news/statue-black-mother-modern-medicine-6013028

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-58761785

Seehttps://invisiblewomen.org.uk/gettingattention/post/197

'Contemplation' Anne Lister (Gentleman Jack)

Artist:
Diane Lawrenson

Date erected:
26 Sep 2021

Place:
Halifax, West Yorkshire

Commissioner:
The Piece Hall Trust

Anne Lister (1791-1840); prominent 19th century diarist, landowner, and “first modern lesbian” had strong connections to Halifax as a successful female entrepreneur and landowner. She lived at nearby Shibden Hall until her death in 1840. She wrote an estimated five million words detailing her life as a landowner and businesswoman and her liaisons with other women, as well as portraying the network of relationships between women of the gentry and aristocracy in early 19th century Halifax and beyond.
The installation, called ‘Contemplation’, which was funded by The Piece Hall Trust, rounds off a series of events to mark the 181st anniversary of Lister’s death.
“It felt right that we, as The Piece Hall Trust, helped enable this remarkable new piece of art, commemorating a woman who continues to have such an impact locally, nationally, and internationally," said Chief Executive of The Piece Hall Trust, Nicky Chance-Thompson. She said: “It’s vitally important that we continue to tell the story of strong women throughout history, whether it’s through our television screens like Gentleman Jack or works like this that will encourage people to delve deeper into her life."
The actor Suranne Jones who played Anne in the tv series "Gentleman Jack " unveiled the statue and was joined by the BBC series creator Sally Wainwright and sculptor Diane Lawrenson ( seen in image with the statue) at the Piece Hall in Halifax as the life-size bronze sculpture of Anne reclining on a plinth was revealed.
This may be the first statue known to be to a lesbian woman in the UK.

https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/people/sculpture-unveiled-of-gentleman-jack-anne-lister-at-halifaxs-piece-hall-3397064
https://www.halifaxcourier.co.uk/news/people/gentleman-jack-star-suranne-jones-and-creator-sally-wainwright-in-halifax-for-unveiling-of-tribute-to-anne-lister-3397076?itm_source=parsely-api

Emily Wilding Davidson

Artist:
Christine Charlesworth

Date erected:
11 Jun 2021

Place:
Epsom Town Centre

Commissioner:
Epsom Council

This engaging likeness of Suffragette martyr Emily Davison, seated on a marble bench, has been unveiled in the town centre of Epsom. She died trying to tie a Suffragette Ribbon to the King's Horse at the Derby in Epsom. Sculptor Christine Charlesworth believes that sculptures should not be raised up on plinths, but should be approachable and easy to access.
http://www.christinecharlesworth.co.uk

Greta Thunberg

Artist:
Christine Charlesworth

Date erected:
30 Mar 2021

Place:
University of Winchester

Commissioner:
University of Winchester

Greta Thunberg's statue, unveiled outside the university of Winchester. The sculptor, Christine Charlesworth, aimed to capture both Greta's determination and her vulnerability. As a very young person with autism Greta has brought the issue of climate change to the world stage in an astonishing way,She has successfully overcome many challenges and used her unique insight to add a powerful voice to the climate change movement.’
http://www.christinecharlesworth.co.uk

A sculpture for Mary Wolstonecraft

Artist:
Maggi Hambling

Date erected:
10 Nov 2020

Place:
Newington Green, London

Commissioner:
Mary on the Green" group

A Sculpture for Mary Wollstonecraft is a public sculpture commemorating the 18th-century feminist writer and advocate Mary Wollstonecraft in Newington Green, London. A work of the British artist Maggi Hambling, it was unveiled on 10 November 2020.
[https://invisiblewomen.org.uk/gettingattention/post/168

Lady Anne’s Way

Artist:
Sculptor: Diane Lawrenson

Date erected:
24 Sep 2020

Place:
Location: Upper Eden Visitor Centre, Kirkby Stephen, Cumbria (formerly Westmorland).

Lady Anne Clifford, Countess of Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery, suo jure 14th Baroness de Clifford (1590–1676), the last member of an important medieval dynasty, she fought for 40 years to inherit her father’s estates. She was responsible for the restoration of a series of castles from Skipton to Brougham, near Penrith. A patron of literature, she provided schools, churches and alms houses. The sculpture entitled Lady Anne’s Way shows her walking along with characteristic energy, it is sited on the route of the long distance path of the same name through old Westmorland and Yorkshire. Rooted in history, the sculptor feels the statue is significant for local people, who are concerned about their loss of identity. Many Kirkby Stephen inhabitants descend from ancient Westmorland families, who have lived in the area for generations.
Founder: Powderhall Bronze
Photo; courtesy of The Old Croft House, Kirkby Stephen.

Reaching Out

Artist:
Thomas J Price

Date erected:
5 Aug 2020

Place:
Three Mills Green near Stratford, east London

Commissioner:
Unknown

At 9ft tall and weighing 420 kilograms, a public statue of a black everywoman, she is impossible to miss but she is also strikingly ordinary – an antidote, the artist hopes, to chest-puffing and hero worship. Like most of the rest of the world, she is on her phone. The artwork is called Reaching Out and is deliberately not based on any particular woman. “I want this sculpture to be an opportunity for people to connect emotionally with an image of someone they might not have noticed before,” Price said. “It is also about people being able to recognise themselves, or people they know.”Price said the aim was to create something very familiar that challenged “all this grand triumphant sculpture” we normally see. “Often the most powerful person in the room is the person in the background, or fiddling, or not sitting bolt upright smiling.” The sculpture has been installed at Three Mills Green near Stratford, east London, and is part of The Line, the city’s only dedicated public art walk, which follows the Greenwich Meridian.
https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2020/aug/05/sculptor-thomas-j-price-black-everywoman-reaching-out-erected-at-public-art-walk-in-london

Nancy Astor

Artist:
Hayley Gibbs

Date erected:
29 Nov 2019

Place:
Plymouth

Commissioner:
Nancy Astor Statue Appeal

Nancy Astor was the first woman to take her seat in parliament in 1919. 100 years later she was finally being honoured in her Devon constituency of Plymouth. The impressive campaign for this statue shows just how possible it is to redress the historic attitudes that choose ignore women's achievements. This great effort has galvanised a whole community and Great Western Railway has named a train ‘Nancy Astor Express’ – one of GWR’s ‘First Great Westerners.

Theresa May, who unveiled the statue, said Astor had been forced to withstand the jeers and bawdy jokes of male colleagues – and the lack of female toilets – when she arrived in the Commons in 1919, but she had paved the way for future women MPs. Her perseverence has been reflected in the determination of the women of Plymouth to have a memorial of this ground-breaking politician.
Theresa May also said “We don’t have nearly enough monuments to the great women of our past. I’m pleased we’re starting to put that right.” So, it's good to have yet another prominent supporter for the cause of all the inVISIBLEwomen.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/nov/28/theresa-may-unveils-statue-of-pioneering-mp-nancy-astor

https://www.ladyastorstatue100.co.uk

Lily Parr

Artist:
Hannah Stewart

Date erected:
3 Jun 2019

Place:
National Football Museum in Manchester.

Commissioner:
Mars

A statue of Lily Parr, who is widely recognised as one of the early trailblazers of women’s football, is now on display at the National Football Museum in Manchester. The life-size bronze statue is situated on the first floor of the museum in the players zone, which explores footballing pioneers and the challenges and prejudices they fought to overcome. It is the first statue of a female footballer to be unveiled anywhere in the UK. An outside left winger, Parr scored over 980 goals in 833 games during a 32-year career for Dick, Kerr Ladies, one of the earliest women’s teams in England.“This is a momentous moment and Lily thoroughly deserves this honour,” said former England women captain Faye White.

“As a female footballer, it’s inspiring to see the progress we’re making in celebrating women in sport. Women’s football has come a long way since it first began and I’m looking forward to cheering on the England Lionesses this summer ( 2019 ) alongside the nation.”

The statue was created by sculptor Hannah Stewart, was commissioned by Mars as part of its ongoing #SupportHer campaign to inspire the current England women’s team and future female sports stars.

Queen Aethelflaed

Artist:
Luke Perry

Date erected:
20 May 2019

Place:
Tamworth

Commissioner:
Roundabout Art Arts Council England Tamworth GHateways Project

The six-metre tall steel figure of Anglo-Saxon warrior Queen, Aethelflaed is a key figure from Tamworth’s past, having played a pivotal role in English history by building a chain of fortifications against Viking invaders throughout the Kingdom of Mercia. Her fortification of Tamworth in 913 AD became the forerunner to Tamworth Castle. Daughter of King Alfred the Great, Aethelflaed’s accession as a female ruler has been described as one of the most unique events in early medieval history.

She was chosen as the subject for the new statue following consultations with local people, exploring what they are most proud of about Tamworth. Luke’s final design aimed to reflect the town’s Anglo-Saxon history, but with an ‘alternative, modern twist’ that places it firmly in the 21st century.

Messenger

Artist:
Hillier

Date erected:
18 Mar 2019

Place:
Theatre Royal Plymouth

Commissioner:
Theatre Royal Plymouth

Creator says that the seven-metre high Messenger is important, in the #metoo era, as a counterpoint to the many statues of men across UK. It is the largest piece made by the lost wax process and the largest statue of a woman in the country. Modelled on an actor in movement, symbolising the way that the theatre brings its messages to the audience.

Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst

Artist:
Hazel Reeve

Date erected:
17 Dec 2018

Place:
St Peters Square Manchester

Commissioner:
City of Manchester

The first statue of a woman in Manchester in 100 years - the other is Queen Victoria. Erected on the 100th anniversary of the first UK election in which women were able to vote. Funded by vigorous campaign lead by councillor Andrew Simcock, with vote for the most popular female figure.
http://www.hazelreeves.com

Annie Kenney

Artist:
Denise Dutton,

Date erected:
14 Dec 2018

Place:
Outside Town Hall Oldham

Commissioner:
People of Oldham

Annie Kenney was said to be the only working class woman to hold a senior position in the ‘Women’s Social and Political Union’ (WSPU), which spearheaded the campaign for universal suffrage under the banner ‘Votes for Women'.
Not a single penny for the statue came from the Council, the Government or the Lottery. This is genuinely a people’s statue. A councillor said "It is an absolutely beautiful statue, and not only that, Annie’s story has now been told to thousands of people, not just in Oldham. She used to be Oldham’s best kept secret, but the statue in Parliament Square really is a staggering addition to our town centre.

May Donoghue

Artist:
Mandy McIntosh

Date erected:
12 Sep 2018

Place:
The Tannahill Centre in Paisley’s Ferguslie Park

Commissioner:
unknown

This is often known as the story of ‘the snail and the ginger beer’, but what this does is take the emphasis off the snail and put it back onto this determined woman, who pushed this through and changed consumer law.
Mrs Donoghue was a single mother, with one living child who had left her husband and didn’t have a lot of money behind her. But she fought this case through. Paisley-based artist Mandy McIntosh used the only family photo - the sole surviving picture of May - as the inspiration for a bronze statue.1 May at The Tannahill Centre in Paisley’s Ferguslie Park.
https://www.paisley.org.uk/2018/02/statue-to-commemorate-woman-at-centre-of-the-landmark-snail-and-bottle-legal-case/
http://womenofscotland.org.uk

Emily Wilding Davidson

Artist:
Ray Lonsdale

Date erected:
11 Sep 2018

Place:
Morpeth

Commissioner:
Northumberland County Council

Emily moved to her family’s home in Longhorsley near Morpeth when her father died in 1893. Although an annual commemoration of Davison’s life is held at St Mary’s church in Morpeth, there has previously been no prominent memorial to her life and achievements other than her grave in the town. An information panel has also been installed in Carlisle Park to highlight the significant role Emily played in the suffragette movement, something also planned for Epsom, It includes a walking trail to help visitors and local residents, in particular the younger generation, learn more about her efforts and her close links to the area.

Elizabeth Frink

Artist:
F.E. McWilliams

Date erected:
1 Aug 2018

Place:
Herbert Art Gallery & Museum, Coventry

Commissioner:
Coventry City Council

Elizabeth Frink (1930-1993) was one of Britain's foremost modern figurative sculptors in the post war period. She was one of only two women who authored artworks for the new Coventry Cathedral.
This statue was originally made by the sculptor F.E.McWilliams for Harlow New Town in 1957. A second cast from the original mould was made for an exhibition at the Herbert Art Gallery Coventry in 1965. It was placed on permanent display outside the gallery the following year. It also remains on display in Harlow.

Millicent Fawcett

Artist:
Gillian Wearing OBE

Date erected:
24 Apr 2018

Place:
Parliament Square London

Commissioner:
City of London and the government's Centenary Fund

A statue of suffragist leader Millicent Fawcett was unveiled in Parliament Square. Created by Turner Prize-winning artist Gillian Wearing OBE, this historic statue is the first ever monument of a woman and the first designed by a woman to stand within the square.
The unveiling ceremony included speeches by Prime Minister, Theresa May; the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan and activist Caroline Criado-Perez who lead the campaign for a statue of a women in Parliament Square. The figure holds a banner with the words of militant Suffragette Emily Wilding Davidson, who was killed under the king's horse while protesting at the Derby of 1913
The First World War saw seismic changes to women’s roles in society, including the first UK women gaining the right to vote. This new work by Gillian Wearing, the first-ever statue of a woman in Parliament Square recognises the huge contribution of Fawcett and many other people involved in the struggle for universal suffrage.”

Mary Barbour

Artist:
Andrew Brown

Date erected:
8 Mar 2018

Place:
Govan, Glasgow

Commissioner:
Remember Mary Barbour Campaign

Mary Barbour was a social reformer who first came to prominence as one of the founders of the Women;s Peace Crusade and was one of the organisers of the Glasgow Rent Strike of 1915. She organised committees, prevented evictions (leading a female-led opposition, commonly referred to as Mrs Barbour’s army) and opposed the sheriff officers. Thanks to the action taken in Glasgow, the British Government passed the Rent Restriction Act, forcing landlords to stop charging overinflated rents during 1914-18 Great War. She also one of the first women councillors in the city, and went on to be one of the first female magistrates in Glasgow. She was active on various aspects of social reforms, including avoiding food waste by redistribution, and also helped found the first family planning centre in the city. The image is released by Lesley Mitchell under a creative commons licence: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mary_Barbour_Statue_-_Side_view.jpg

Alice Hawkins

Artist:
Sean Hedges-Quinn

Date erected:
4 Feb 2018

Place:
Leicester

A Suffragette imprisoned multiple times, a shoe machinist and mother of 6 who was buried in a pauper's grave now honoured for her selfless work for women's suffrage.

The Cracker Packers

Artist:
Hazel Reeves

Date erected:
24 Jan 2018

Place:
Carlisle

Commissioner:
Pladis, the global biscuit and confectionery company plus £65,000 from Sainsbury’s (as part of their development of a Carlisle superstore) and £5,000 from author Hunter Davies.

Statue of an historic biscuit factory worker with a contemporary.

Bronze Woman

Artist:
Ian Walters & Aleix Barbat

Date erected:
8 Oct 2017

Place:
Stockwell Memorial Garden, south London.

Commissioner:
Ms Nobrega / Tanzeem Ahmed from Olmec

BRONZE WOMAN
The Bronze Woman is many things – she is the first public monument of a black woman in England, a symbol of the contribution of Caribbean, and indeed all, women to society and proof that people who have the courage to pursue their dreams can inspire others to great achievements. The Bronze Woman Monument was revealed in South London’s Stockwell Memorial Garden on October 8, 2008. (view BBC footage, view photo gallery)

The Bronze Woman sculpture of an African-Caribbean woman holding aloft a child was created to celebrate the contribution of the Afro-Caribbean community to the Capital, on the 200th anniversary of the end of the transatlantic slave trade in 2008.

The Bronze Woman sculpture was supported to fruition by the Bronze Woman committee and Olmec, a race equality organisation, following Cecile Nobrega’s ten-year quest to see this project through.

Internationally renowned sculptor Ian Walters was commissioned to handle the project in 2005 before the completion of his statue of Nelson Mandela which now stands in Parliament Square. Walters completed a two foot high maquette of The Bronze Woman before he died in 2006. Aleix Barbat, graduate of Heatherley’s School of Fine Art completed the sculpture in 2008.

“I believe it is important not only for the black community, but for all the people of the United Kingdom to acknowledge the past and the values we share; and to acknowledge how much we owe each other. The Caribbean – its past, present and future – is a subject very close to my own heart and I was delighted to be part of this tremendous celebration”.Baroness Scotland QC
The Attorney General, October 2008

Jane Austen

Artist:
Adam Roud

Date erected:
17 Jul 2017

Place:
Basingstoke Market Place

Commissioner:
Hampshire Cultural Trust

A statue of Jane Austen has been unveiled on the 200th anniversary of her death.
The £100,000 life-sized bronze sculpture of the author is in Basingstoke's Market Place.
Commissioned by the Hampshire Cultural Trust, it was unveiled at a ceremony attended by civic figures as well as Austen fans in Regency costume. Jane Austen spent the first 25 years of her life in nearby Steventon where her father was vicar.

Floella Benjamin

Artist:
Luke Shepherd

Date erected:
10 Feb 2017

Place:
University of Exeter Campus

Commissioner:
the University of Exeter

Exeter University has unveiled a sculpture celebrating well-loved TV presenter and Baroness of Beckenham, Floella Benjamin - making her the only living black person in the UK to have a sculpture on public display.She was chancellor at the University of Exeter from 2006 to 2016.
https://www.bromleytimes.co.uk/news/beckenham-baroness-floella-benjamin-becomes-the-only-living-black-person-in-the-uk-to-have-a-sculpture-1-4890768

Cilla Black

Artist:
Andy Edwards

Date erected:
16 Jan 2017

Place:
Liverpool

Commissioner:
Black's sons Robert, Ben and Jack Willis,

The bronze statue depicting a young Cilla was erected outside the spot were the famous Cavern Club used to be, and commissioned by her sons Robert, Ben, and Jack as donation to the city in memory of their mother.

Amy Johnson

Artist:
Stephen Melton

Date erected:
16 Sep 2016

Place:
Herne Bay and Hull

Commissioner:
funded by local people and businesses.

Result: Amy Johnson.

A statue in Herne Bay to Amy Johnson and another in Hull, following a blistering campaign by engineer, Jane Priston.

On 5 January 1941, British record breaking aviatrix Amy Johnson died serving her country off the shores of Herne Bay, Kent, England.

Inspiring - building on Amy’s legacy to inspire the next generation to consider a career in aviation and engineering, follow their dreams and “believe nothing to be impossible” (Amy Johnson, 1936).

http://www.amyjohnsonhernebay.com/
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-37395430

Amy Johnson

Artist:
Stephen Melton

Date erected:
1 Sep 2016

Place:
Westbrick Avenue

Commissioner:
unknown

Amy Johnson statue, Hull
Installed in September 2016 as part of a local two-month Amy Johnson Festival in celebration of her life. The sculpture is on a grassed area off Westbrick Avenue on the site of a former primary school named after the aviator.

It was unveiled by another famous daughter of Hull, Maureen Lipman, and is the twin of a statue ( Amy Johnson, Herne Bay) revealed a couple of weeks earlier in Herne Bay, Kent which is close to where Johnson's plane fatally crashed in 1941,
photo © Copyright Paul Harrop and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Mary Webb

Artist:
Sculptor: Jemma Pearson

Date erected:
9 Jul 2016

Place:
Location: Outside Shrewsbury Library, Shropshire.

Commissioner:
unknown

Mary Webb (1881-1927), author, best known for her novel Precious Bane. Webb was born in Leighton a small village south of Shrewsbury.The beautiful Mary Webb bust was unveiled on Saturday 9th July at 11.00 a.m. 2016
Founder: Castle Fine Arts Foundry in Llanrhaeadr
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mary_Webb_statue,_Shrewsbury.jpg

Mary Seacole

Artist:
Martin Jennings

Date erected:
30 Jun 2016

Place:
London, St Thomas Hospital

Commissioner:
not known

A memorial statue believed to be the UK's first in honour of a named black woman has been unveiled in London.30 June 2016
Mary Seacole was a Jamaican-born nurse who cared for wounded British soldiers during the Crimean War in the 19th Century.
The statue's completion follows a 12-year campaign which raised £500,000 to honour her.The statue was created by sculptor Martin Jennings and stands opposite the Houses of Parliament in the grounds of St Thomas' Hospital.
It is inscribed with words written in 1857 by The Times' Crimean War correspondent, Sir William Howard Russell: "I trust that England will not forget one who nursed her sick, who sought out her wounded to aid and succour them, and who performed the last offices for some of her illustrious dead."
Chancellor George Osborne announced the Treasury would contribute £240,000 to help pay for the installation.

Gracie Fields

Artist:
Sean Hedges-Quin

Date erected:
18 Jun 2016

Place:
The Butts Rochdale

Commissioner:
Rochdale Rotary clubs

This popular local campaign for internationally famous singer Gracie Fields, described as " the Madonna of her day " was run by the 2 Rotary Clubs raised £40,000 from Grantscape. Started in July 2014 the statue was erected in September 2016.

Women of Steel

Artist:
Martin Jennings

Date erected:
17 Jun 2016

Place:
Barkers Pool, Sheffield

A public appeal has raised over £160,000 for a stunning bronze statue to be unveiled as a permanent memorial to the Women of Steel in Barker's Pool in the city centre.

Above photo from @ShefACSE on Twitter.

The statue is designed by sculptor Martin Jennings who worked closely with a group of Women of Steel to come up with the design.

Dr Erinma Bell MBE

Artist:
Karen Lyons

Date erected:
8 Jun 2016

Place:
Manchester Central Library

Commissioner:
CARISMA

Portrait of Erinma Bell MBE, DL, Peace activist. Cast from recycled guns obtained from
Manchester Police in association with CARISMA (Community Alliance for
Renewal inner South Manchester Area) and Guns 2 Goods - an
organisation that recycles weapons into artefacts for the promotion of
peace in Manchester.

Basseys Cry

Artist:
Marc Rees

Date erected:
1 May 2016

Place:
Caernarfon Castle. Wales

Commissioner:
unknown

A 20ft tall Dame Shirley Bassey statue in a Boudicca pose was unveiled at Caernarfon Castle.

Dubbed " the golden Bassey’s Cry', by artist Marc Rees, marked the start of a three-day celebration of arts, culture and creativity in Wales in 2016.
Photo by Arwyn Roberts. North Wales Live.
09.21

‘Eyemouth Widows and Bairns’

Artist:
Jill Watson

Date erected:
1 Apr 2016

Place:
Eyemouth, Scottish Borders

Commissioner:
unknown

Eyemouth Widows and Bairns’, Eyemouth, Scottish Borders
erected 2016, sculpture by Jill Watson
A magnificent memorial to the ‘Eyemouth Widows and Bairns’ by the sculptor Jill Watson. It remembers those local fishermen who lost their lives in the great storm of 14th October 1881. Each individual character in the sculpture represents one of the bereaved.

The Gansey Girl

Artist:
Steve Carvill

Date erected:
30 Oct 2015

Place:
Bridlington

Commissioner:
unknown

The bronze sculpture, named The Gansey Girl, has historic and sentimental meaning in that she reflects the fishing history in Bridlington as well as the families in the town.She depicts a young woman sitting on a plinth knitting a gansey, a traditional jumper that contains a rich pattern of symbolism passed down through generations of fishing families.The Gansey Girl is positioned so that she bids farewell to fishermen leaving the harbour, as well as welcoming them back home to their families.
https://www.u3asites.org.uk

Joan Littlewood

Artist:
Philip Jackson

Date erected:
6 Oct 2015

Place:
Theatre Royal Stratford East Newham

Commissioner:
Theatre Royal Stratford East

Joan Maud Littlewood (1914 - 2002) was an English theatre director, who trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, and is best known for her work in developing the Theatre Workshop. She has been called "The Mother of Modern Theatre".Her production of Oh, What a Lovely War! in 1963 was one of her most influential pieces.Littlewood and her company lived and slept in the Theatre Royal while it was restored.

Charlotte Mary Yonge

Artist:
Sculptor: Vivien Mallock (b. 1945)

Date erected:
1 Jan 2015

Place:
Location: Eastleigh, Hants.

Commissioner:
unknown

Charlotte Mary Yonge (1823-1901), novelist, editor, biographer, essayist, journalist and writer of textbooks, whose work spread the influence of the Oxford Movement. She lived in Otterbourne, near Eastleigh (the parish which she named) all her life. Her statue, in bronze resin, seated on bench was unveiled in 2015.

Ada Salter

Artist:
Diane Gorvin

Date erected:
30 Nov 2014

Place:
Thames Wall, Bermondsey, London SE16

Commissioner:
Southwark Council

For many years there had been a statue of Dr Alfred Salter MP in this locality but after it was stolen by metal-thieves in 2011 it emerged that the career of his wife, Ada Salter, had probably been as important, if not more important, than his. The Salter Statues Campaign was therefore launched to raise funds for two statues, to be commissioned by the artist, Diane Gorvin. Over 2011-14 Southwark Council match-funded whatever the campaigners raised until they finally reached their target of £120,000. Ada's statue was only the 15th public statue of a woman in London, compared to hundreds of statues of men. It was the first public statue in London of an elected woman politician, the first of a 'green' environmentalist, the first of a woman trade unionist and the first of a Quaker woman. Research into her life showed that she was indeed a remarkable woman. A biography of her was published in 2016 - Ada Salter, Pioneer of Ethical Socialism by Graham Taylor - and this described how, despite Ada's national and international importance, she had been rendered invisible for 72 years by a mixture of overt prejudice and institutional bias.
Photo; Diane Gorvin.

The Lady in the Park

Artist:
Andy Edwards and made by PM Training and Realise.

Date erected:
12 Nov 2014

Place:
Brampton Park, Newcastle-under-Lyme

Commissioner:
Newcastle-under-Lyme Borough Council

Lady In The Park, Brampton Park, Newcastle-under-Lyme, located in the grounds of Brampton Park on Brampton Road. The life-sized sculpture, created in steel, designed by Andy Edwards and made by PM Training and Realise.
This sculpture depicts a woman reading a letter informing her that a family member has been killed in action. The inspiration for the woman was Vera Brittain (1893–1970), who was born in Newcastle-under-Lyme and worked as a Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) nurse for much of the First World War. Brittain’s best-selling memoir Testament of Youth (1933), described her experiences during and after the First World War, which saw the loss of her brother, fiancé and some of her closest friends. A plaque beside the sculpture has a quote from Brittain’s Testament of Youth:
‘I sat in a tree-shadowed walk called the Brampton and meditated on the War. It was one of those shimmering autumn days when every leaf and flower seemed to scintillate with light, and I found it very hard to believe that not far away men were being slain ruthlessly. It is impossible, I concluded, to find any satisfaction in the thought of the destruction of men whether they be English, French, German or anything else, seems a crime to the whole march of civilisation.’
Unveiled in November 2014, Lady in the Park was installed to commemorate the centenary of the start of the First World War. Commissioned by the Borough Council and made by the PM Training and the Realise charity and fabricated from 200 sheets of steel formed into lifelike features and drapery, then treated to resemble bronze. The statue was designed by local sculptor Andy Edwards. The Realise Foundation and Travis Perkins each contributed £10k towards the project. A Councillor said: “It shows a real sense of pride in Newcastle-under-Lyme and we want to carry it into the future. It was an honour for me to unveil the statue". Art apprentice Callum Marchese, 16, worked alongside sculptor Andy Edwards to create the statue, made from a mixture of recycled and new metal. Callum said: “I’m very proud of myself and the Artworks team, not many 16-year-olds have sculptured a woman out of metal so I’m delighted.” At the unveiling, there was a reading from the poem 'Testament of Youth' by Vera Brittain.
The Realise Foundation is a regeneration charity, which helps people and communities in North Staffordshire to reach their full potential.

https://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM106EH_Lady_in_the_Park_Brampton_Park_Newcastle_under_Lyme_Staffordshire_UK

A Real Family

Artist:
Gillian Wearing

Date erected:
30 Oct 2014

Place:
Birmingham City Library

Commissioner:
Arts Council England, Birmingham City Council, Ikon

The sculpture celebrates A Real Birmingham Family. Situated outside the city’s library, it honours what curator Stuart Tulloch calls the “everyday and unsung”. The image of the prosaic-sounding Joneses presents a family that is two single mothers, one heavily pregnant, proudly striding forward, holding on to their sons. It is an emotive and commanding work of art and has caused some controversy because it does not include a father. This is, of course the everyday reality for many families in the UK and this civic statue acknowledges and celebrates the integrity of the non-traditional family group.

Land Girls and Lumber Jills

Artist:
Denise Dutton

Date erected:
22 Oct 2014

Place:
Staffordshire Royal Arboretum

Commissioner:
Unknown

The Women's Land Army was first formed in 1915. During the Second World War, more than 80,000 women laboured to help produce 70 per cent of Britain's food.
The Women's Timber Corps worked in forests and sawmills producing pit props, railway sleepers and barricades in a bid to boost the war effort.
It was disbanded in 1946, although the Women's Land Army continued for a further four years. In total, nearly a quarter of a million Land Girls and Lumber Jills served their country.
Photo;www.northernvicar.co.uk

Amy Winehouse

Artist:
Scott Eaton

Date erected:
14 Sep 2014

Place:
Camden Stable Market, London

Commissioner:
not known

Wonderfully talented but troubled British singer and songwriter who had become strongly associated with Camden Town until her death in 2011. Winehouse died at her nearby Camden Square home of alcohol poisoning on 23 July 2011. The statue was unveiled in 2014, three years after the singer's death.

Helen Crummy

Artist:
Tim Chalk

Date erected:
1 Jan 2014

Place:
East Neighbourhood Centre Edinburgh

Commissioner:
City of Edinburgh Council

Commissioned to commemorate the life and work of Helen Crummy, the founder of the Craigmillar Festival Society. The work includes two bronze figures; Helen handing a bow to a boy holding a violin, standing in an open doorway, symbolising the door opening onto his creative potential. Dr Helen Crummy's venture has been lauded worldwide for its innovative approach to community arts, social change and community action.
She set it up when her son's school refused to give him a violin lesson. The sculpture, by Tim Chalk, outside the East Neighbourhood Centre. Dr Crummy has also been to the European Parliament to speak about its success
The sculpture, one of only three public statues in Edinburgh to honour women, also incorporates work by local adults and children who sang at the unveiling ceremony.
Dr Crummy's son's original violin will also be played at the Niddrie Road ceremony at 14:00 on Friday.
The statue was funded by the City of Edinburgh Council, with a further contribution by Craigmillar Castle Regeneration Group. Commissioned by the City of Edinburgh Council No exact date given for erection so 1st Jan is a place holder until a date is submitted
photo;http://womenofscotland.org.uk

Harriet Tubman,

Artist:
Sculptor: Melanie Wilks

Date erected:
1 Oct 2013

Place:
Location: Huddersfield Library and Art Gallery, Princess Alexandra Walk, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.

Commissioner:
Kirklees Council

Harriet Tubman, born Araminta Ross, (c.1820 -1913) an abolitionist and political activist was known as the ‘Moses of her people’. An escaped slave from the South, she was a leading figure as a ‘conductor’ on the Underground Railroad, which helped hundreds of slaves to escape to freedom. During the American Civil War she worked as a nurse and cook, then as an armed scout and spy. She was active in the women’s suffrage movement. The Harriet Tubman Memorial was commissioned by Kirklees Council as part of Black history month to mark the hundredth anniversary of the her death. Wilks created the concept for the sculpture working with students from the Netherhall Learning Campus, Huddersfield. The plinth on which the portrait bust sits is carved with reliefs inspired by African art and culture. The work in Maltese limestone is signed and dated. It was unveiled on 1 October 2013.
No Image available. Please send one in or see PSSA.UK Site

Dorothy Round

Artist:
John McKenna

Date erected:
20 Sep 2013

Place:
Priory Park,Dudley

Commissioner:
Dudley MBC

Twice Wimbledon champion Dorothy Edith Round Little was a World No. 1 British female tennis player. She was born in Dudley, Worcestershire, England. A player of formidable power and experience, she developed her game from that of a sports-minded schoolgirl to that of a Wimbledon champion, making that transition almost seamlessly.
This statue was commissioned by Dudley MBC for a site in Priory Park, Dudley adjacent to the park Tennis courts. The statue is named 'The Return of Dorothy Round' and the idea and arrangement of pose was conceived by Steve Field a close artistic associate of sculptor john mcKenna. Dorothy was famed for her ability to return the tennis ball well and in consultation with her family relatives it was decided that a statue pose depicting this return stance would be created.

John McKenna modelled the claywork and cast the statue in his A4a art foundry studio in Ayrshire.

Dame Mary Peters

Artist:
Sculptor: John Sherlock

Date erected:
25 Jun 2013

Place:
Belfast

Commissioner:
Not known

DAME MARY PETERS . PENTATHLON OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALLIST MUNICH 1972.

Dame Agatha Christie, DBE

Artist:
Designer: Ben Twiston-Davies (b.1971)

Date erected:
25 Nov 2012

Place:
Location: Corner of Great Newport Street and Cranbourn Street, Covent Garden, London WC2.

Commissioner:
Christie’s grandson and was implemented together with Sir Stephen Waley-Cohen, current producer of The Mousetrap.

Dame Agatha Christie, DBE (1890-1976) was the author of short stories and 66 detective novels, featuring her two sleuths Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Also a playwright, she was responsible for the world’s longest running play The Mousetrap. This memorial commemorates her contribution to the theatre, the only female playwright to have three West End plays running at the same time. It was unveiled on 25 November 2012 to commemorate the 60th anniversary of The Mousetrap. The bronze is a large relief sculpture of a book with the titles of some of her works and a portrait bust of Christie in the centre, lit from inside and beneath. The idea for the memorial came from Christie’s grandson and was implemented together with Sir Stephen Waley-Cohen, current producer of The Mousetrap.
Photo:https://agathachristie.fandom.com/wiki

Kitty Wilkinson 'The Saint of the Slums"

Artist:
Simon Smith

Date erected:
1 Nov 2012

Place:
St. Georges Hall, Liverpool.

Commissioner:
Liverpool City Council

Catherine ‘Kitty’ Wilkinson.
Carrara Marble.
0.8m x 0.8m x 2.2m

Kitty Wilkinson
Liverpool City Council commissioned a statue of a remarkable woman called Kitty Wilkinson (1786-1860). She was known as 'The Saint of the Slums' for her pioneering work in public hygiene during the Cholera epidemic in the 1800's.
The statue is over life sized and carved in marble and placed in St. Georges Hall, Liverpool, a grade 1 listed building. It is the first statue to be placed in the Hall for more than 100 years , and the first to represent a woman. The finished statue was unveiled in September 2012 by a descendent of Kitty Wilkinson. It depicts a strong, determined and caring woman carved in marble from the Cava di Michel Angelo in Carrara, Italy.
The statue now has a grade 1 listing.

Noor Inayat Khan

Artist:
Karen Newman

Date erected:
1 Nov 2012

Place:
Gordon Square London WC1

Commissioner:
Campaigners spent years raising £60,000 for Noor’s statue from public donations.

In November 2012, seven decades after her death aged 30, a statue to the forgotten heroine was unveiled in London by the Princess Royal.The bronze bust commemorates Britain’s only female Muslim war heroine and is the first stand-alone memorial to an Asian woman in the UK.Noor Inayat Khan was part of an elite band of women in the Special Operations Executive (SOE) and the first woman radio operator to be flown into occupied France to aid the Resistance. Princess Anne said stories such as Noor’s are ‘remarkable in their own right’ but have a real connection to make with the modern age through their ‘multi-cultural aspect’.
dailymail.co.uk/news/article
Photo David Parker

Dame Kelly Holmes

Artist:
Unknown

Date erected:
30 Aug 2012

Place:
Portman Square London

Commissioner:
Sure Maximum Protection

Sure Maximum Protection polled Brits to uncover the top ten influential and strong British women that the nation would like to see celebrated for their lifetime achievements. Dame Kelly Holmes topped the vote, with Jessica Ennis the one to watch for future commemoration.

Janet Street-Porter commented: “This research shows that successful women – past and present – are completely under-represented when it comes to the number of official statues in the UK. We should look to reverse this trend going forward to ensure influential women and role models such as Dame Kelly Holmes and JK Rowling, as well as stars in their prime like Jessica Ennis, receive the fitting tribute they truly deserve.”

To help rectify the balance, Sure Maximum Protection has created a life size statue of Dame Kelly Holmes, who topped the list, and donated it to her hometown of Pembury in Kent, but after controversy about its lack of likeness to Dame Kelly it currently stands in Portman Square, central London.

The top 10 women Brits would most like to see celebrated with a statue for their achievements are:

1. Dame Kelly Holmes (24 per cent)
2. JK Rowling (22 per cent)
3. Joanna Lumley (14 per cent)
4. Dame Vivienne Westwood (9 per cent)
5. Adele (7 per cent)
6. Katie Piper (6 per cent)
7. Kate Winslet (6 per cent)
8. Karren Brady (2 per cent)
9. Nigella Lawson (2 per cent)
10. Victoria Beckham (2 per cent)

Reported in Sportsister

The Women’s Sports Magazine
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-kent-41568689

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2198122/It-looks-like-Jessica-Ennis-Embarrassment-deodorant-makers-Sure-commissions-rubbish-statue-Dame-Kelly-Holmes.html

Alice Nutter

Artist:
David Palmer of DP Structures Ltd.

Date erected:
18 Jul 2012

Place:
Roughlee

Commissioner:
Borough & Parish Council of Roughlee

Blacko Bar Road between Crowtrees and Roughlee.
This sculpture was created to commemorate the 400th anniversary of one of the most infamous witch trials of the 17th century - that of the Pendle witches. These women lived in the early 1600's at a time of religious persecution and superstition.

Fabricated from brass and corten steel, it depicts Alice Nutter of Roughlee who was unusual among the accused as she was the wealthy widow of a farmer. She kept silent throughout her trial except to enter a plea of not guilty to the murder of Henry Mitton by witchcraft.

The local Borough & Parish Council of Roughlee led a scheme to commission the erection of a sculpture of ‘Alice’. It depicts her shackled and on her way to trial. It aims to help people reassess their concept of women falsely convicted and killed. https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/pendle/9845430.New_statue_gives_Pendle__witch__the_respect_she_deserves/

Twiggy

Artist:
Sculptor: Neal French

Date erected:
1 Jan 2012

Place:
Location: Outside Bourdon House, Mayfair, London SW1.

Commissioner:
unknown

Twiggy (b.1949) This public sculpture is a realistic scene in which a passing shopper comes across Terence Donovan photographing the model Twiggy near to his Mayfair studio in the 1960s. The bronze sculpture was unveiled in 2012. exact date unknown
Photo:https://everystreetinlondon.com/tag/twiggy/

Mary MacArthur

Artist:
Sculptor: Luke Perry (b.1983)

Date erected:
1 Jan 2012

Place:
Mary Macarthur Gardens in Cradley Heath

Commissioner:
Unknown

Mary Reid Anderson (née Macarthur; 13 August 1880 – 1 January 1921) was a Scottish suffragist and was a leading trades unionist. She was the general secretary of the Women's Trade Union League and was involved in the formation of the National Federation of Women Workers and National Anti-Sweating League. In 1910, Macarthur led the women chain makers of Cradley Heath to victory in their fight for a minimum wage and led a strike to force employers to implement the rise. About 1901, Macarthur became a trade unionist after hearing a speech made by John Turner about how badly some workers were being treated by their employers. Mary became secretary of the Ayr branch of the Shop Assistants' Union, and her interest in this union led to her work for the improvement of women's labour conditions. In 1902 Mary became friends with Margaret Bondfield who encouraged her to attend the union's national conference where Macarthur became the first woman to be elected to the union's national executive.A statue was unveiled of Mary Macarthur in Mary Macarthur Gardens in Cradley Heath, West Midlands in 2012. ( exact date unknown)
Photo;https://en.wikipedia.org

Violette Szabo

Date erected:
1 May 2009

Place:
London SE1, Albert Embankment, South Bank

Commissioner:
Public Memorials Appeal, Patron - His Grace the Duke of Wellington KG, Trustees - Ivan Saxton (Founder) Lady Barbirolli OBE Michael Kennedy CBE Ian Davidson (Hon. Sec.)

Violette was a member of the Special Operations Executive, one of 407 operatives sent on sabotage missions to Nazi occupied France during the war to fight with the French Resistance known as the Maquis. She was one of the 117 SOE agents who did not survive and was posthumously awarded the George Cross and the Crois de Guerre.

Herring Girls

Artist:
Charles Engebretsen and Ginny Hutchison.

Date erected:
1 May 2009

Place:
Stornaway Harbour Isle of Lewis Scoltand

Commissioner:
unknown

In Stornoway, the main town on the island of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides, there’s a statue of a young girl sculpted by Charles Engebretsen and Ginny Hutchison.

Fishing boats are moored alongside in the harbour and you don’t need to be a historian to see that this sculpture is of a young girl in the late nineteenth/early twentieth century going about her daily business of gutting herrings, ready to be placed into the barrels beside her

https://stornowayhistoricalsociety.org.uk/work-of-the-herring-girls/

Bessie Braddock

Artist:
Tom Murphy

Date erected:
11 Jan 2009

Place:
Lime Street station Liverpool

Commissioner:
Merseytravel

Bessie Braddock, the MP for Liverpool Exchange for 24 years, is one of the city’s most legendary political figures.
Born in Liverpool in 1899 her mother Mary Bamber was committed to helping the local poor and at three weeks old Bessie was taken to her first political meeting with her mother. An ardent socialist Bessie Braddock campaigned tirelessly for her Liverpool constituents and was regarded affectionately by them. Known as 'Battling Bessie', she is honoured with a statue at Liverpool's Lime Street Station erected 11 JUN 2009 Commissioned by Merseytravel who said: “Public art is a key element to our business and we are delivering some exciting projects.
https://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/gallery/ken-dodd-bessie-braddock-statues-3196124

Jane Austen

Artist:
Adam Round

Date erected:
8 Jun 2008

Place:
St. Nicholas Church, Chawton House, Alton, Hampshire.

Commissioner:
unknown

Jane Austen from the same maquette as the statue in Basingstoke, St. Nicholas Church, Chawton House, Alton, Hampshire.
Photo:https://janeaustenquickstepguide.com/jane-austen-has-a-twin/

Mrs Sophie Booth (‘The Shell Lady’)

Artist:
Sculptor: Ann Carrington

Date erected:
1 Apr 2008

Place:
The Harbour Arm, Old Town, Margate, Kent.

Commissioner:
unknown

Mrs Sophie Booth (‘The Shell Lady’), artist and seaside landlady of the painter JMW Turner (1775-1851). This bronze statue, entitled, Mrs Booth, was unveiled in 2008.
No precise date so 1/1 used until more info provided.
Photo;httpswww.atlasobscura.com CC.

Nicola Adams MBE

Artist:
Not known

Date erected:
17 Jul 2007

Place:
London,N15, West Green Road, Downhills Park

Commissioner:
Sustrans/National lottery

Nicola Adams MBE, the first woman to win Olympic boxing gold medal at the 2012 London Olympics.
Site: Adams, Howard and Tull - steel statues (3 memorials, including 2 other sportsmen)
The characters for this Portrait Bench were chosen by the community to celebrate Sustrans winning a nationwide vote in 2007 to create new walking and cycling routes across the UK, funded by the Big Lottery Fund. www.Sustrans.org.uk
It would be great to see amore substantial figure of this wonderful sportswoman, such a trailblazer.

Lumber Jill

Artist:
Malcolm Robertson

Date erected:
30 Jun 2007

Place:
Near David Marshall Lodge Aberfoyle

Commissioner:
Forestry Commission

Bronze Lumber Jill. Dedicated to: Women's Timber Corps who worked during the war.
There are two plaques - one on the base of the statue and one on a boulder a few metres away.
The year of erection is 2007 but day and month are guesswork. Please update if known.
http://womenofscotland.org.uk/memorials/lumberjill-statue

Isabelle ‘Ella’ Pirrie

Artist:
Sculptor: Ross Wilson (b.1958)

Date erected:
1 Apr 2007

Place:
Location: Belfast City Hospital, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Commissioner:
unknown

Isabelle ‘Ella’ Pirrie DCS (1857-1929) having trained with Florence Nightingale, in 1883 Pirrie became the first nurse in the Belfast Union Workhouse (now Belfast City Hospital), where she established a nursing school. She later became matron of the Deaconess Hospital in Edinburgh (1894-1914), a training school for nurses. The bronze statue shows her holding a letter from Florence Nightingale dated 1 October 1885, which reads ‘…You have already done great things. You must be the nucleus of hope for a goodly future of trained nursing staff at Belfast Infirmary …’. The statue was erected in 2007.
Photo:© Copyright Rossographer and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons. www.geograph

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher

Artist:
Sculptor: Antony Dufort FRSS SPS (b.1948)

Date erected:
21 Feb 2007

Place:
Location: Members' Lobby, Palace of Westminster, London.

Commissioner:
unknown

Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher (1925-2013) was a Conservative politician. She was MP for Finchley 1959-92 and the first woman to become leader of a major political party in the UK. The longest serving British Prime Minister of the twentieth century, she was also the first woman to hold that office. Her statue in bronze was unveiled on 21 February 2007.
Founder: Bronze Age Foundry, Limehouse
Photo;https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statue_of_Margaret_Thatcher_(Palace_of_Westminster)

Nairn Wife

Artist:
Ginny Hutchison and Charles Engebretson

Date erected:
1 Jan 2007

Place:
Harbour Street, Nairn, Scotland

Commissioner:
Highland year of culture

Bronze monument to fish workers in Nairn, erected as part of the Highland Year of Culture 2007.
In Nairn, when the fishing industry was at its height in the late 19th century, the fishwife played a very important role within the community. As well as being responsible for caring for house and family, she also gathered bait, baited lines, gathered durkins (pine cones for smoking fish) prepared and smoked fish, including the famous "Nairn Spelding" then sold them throughout the local area from the creel on her back.
The date of erection is given as 2007 but with no day or month so 1st Jan is a place holder until a date is given.

http://womenofscotland.org.uk/memorials/nairn-fishwife

Anna Pavlova

Artist:
Hary Franchetti

Date erected:
15 Jul 2006

Place:
Victoria Palace, Victoria Street, London, SW1E 5EA

Commissioner:
the theatres original owner, Alfred Butt

The ballerina was born in St Petersburg in 1881 and attended the Imperial Ballet School at the Mariinsky theatre, where her tutor was Marius Petipa. After becoming the Mariinskys principal ballerina she toured the world, setting up home in London where she established a dance school at Ivy House. A statue of Pavlova was added to the top of the newly built theatre in 1911 to celebrate the dancer and the role that the owner, Alfred Butt, played in her career. It is said that Pavlova considered it unlucky for her to see the statue and so avoided looking at it whenever she passed. This was one of a number of London statues which were taken down for safe-keeping in 1939, but this one did not return and is now lost. A replica was installed in 2006, along with the head spike and spider's web entangling the dancer's limbs, presumably intended to deter pigeons - and look - no pigeons!The Victoria stood forlorn, without its gilded decoration for 63 years, when, in 2006, the sculptor Hary Franchetti was commissioned to create a replica of the original. He did so based on a photo or photos of the original.
http://www.shadyoldlady.com/location.php?loc=435

Auxiliary Territorial Service

Artist:
Andy de Comyn

Date erected:
1 May 2006

Place:
National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

Commissioner:
National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

The Auxiliary Territorial Service Statue is the work of Birmingham sculptor Andy de Cimyn who used his wife Francesca as the model. It consists of a cementitious render over a reinforced concrete core. The ATS was founded in September 1938, had 23,900 women in the service in 1939, and 212,500 in 1945. 335 were killed, 94 reported missing, 302 wounded, and 20 became PoWs.
The life-size statue of an Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS) girl wearing a basic khaki uniform was unveiled in 2006 as a memorial to the role played by women in World War II.
Photo;Coin Sweettwww.iwm.org.uk

Dame Sheila Marshall McKechnie,

Artist:
Sculptor: Susanna Robinson

Date erected:
1 Aug 2005

Place:
Location: The walled garden, Dollar Park, Falkirk, Scotland.

Commissioner:
Sheila McKechnie Foundation

Dame Sheila Marshall McKechnie, DBE (1948-2004) was a trade unionist, housing campaigner and consumer activist. She became director of Shelter in 1985 and then ten years’ later director of the Consumers’ Association (now known under the brand name ‘Which?’). Her partner, Alan Grant, helped set up the Sheila McKechnie Foundation after her death and commissioned this portrait bust. The bronze bust is mounted on a sandstone base, which is inscribed: Sheila McKechnie/born Camelon 1948/campaigner for/workers’ safety/the homeless/consumers’ rights/died London 2004/’she made a difference.’ Camelon is close to Falkirk, where the bust was unveiled in August 2005.
She described herself during this time as a “fully paid-up member of the awkward squad” but others remember her as one of the best campaigners of her generation, someone who never tired of fighting injustice and for equality. Awarded an OBE in 1995, she was created a Dame in 2001 for her work on behalf of consumers.
Location: The walled garden, Dollar Park, Falkirk, Scotland.
Photo;https://markwrite.co.uk

Jean Armour

Artist:
unknown

Date erected:
1 Sep 2004

Place:
Opposite St. Michael's Church, Dumfries, Scotland.

Commissioner:
Burns Howff Club

Jean Armour (1765-1834), ‘Bonnie Jean’ the wife of Robert Burns, inspired his poetry. A statue of Armour was erected by the Burns Howff Club in 2006. The design specified she would appear as she did in Robert Burns’ lifetime, with a bible and a small child. The couple moved to Dumfries in 1791 and spent the remainder of their lives there.

Photo; Kevin Rae licensed for reuseCreative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

Virginia Woolf 1882 - 1941

Artist:
Stephen Tomlin

Date erected:
26 Aug 2004

Place:
Tavistock Square London WC1

Commissioner:
Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain

Virginia Woolf lived in a house formerly on the south side of Tavistock Square from 1924 to 1939 where most of her greatest novels were written and published.
'Then one day walking round Tavistock Square I made up, as I sometimes make up my books, To the Lighthouse; in a great, apparently involuntary, rush.'

Jackie Kay

Artist:
Sculptor: Michael Snowdon (b.1931) Letter-cutter: Vincent Butler (1933-2017)

Date erected:
1 Jul 2004

Place:
Location: Lochside Walkway, Edinburgh Park, South Gyle, Edinburgh.

Commissioner:
UNKNOWN

Jackie Kay (b. 1961), writer of plays, short stories and poet. This bronze portrait bust, on Crossland Hill sandstone pillar, was unveiled on 1 July 2004. It forms part of a group of 12 Scottish poets, which are placed at intervals along the Lochside walkway. For further details see Ray McKenzie, Public Sculpture of Edinburgh, vol.1, LUP 2018, pp. 398-400. Founder: Powderhall Bronze
Photo;womenofscotland.org.uk

Linda McCartney

Artist:
Jane Robbins

Date erected:
1 Nov 2002

Place:
The Linda McCartney Memorial Garden

Commissioner:
Sir Paul McCartney

The Linda McCartney Memorial Garden is located next to J.J. Burnet's Campbeltown Museum on Hall Street in Campbeltown (Argyll and Bute). The garden was created by the friends of the American photographer and musician Linda McCartney (1941-98), wife of musician Sir Paul McCartney. Linda and Paul had shared a home at nearby High Park farm following their marriage in 1969 and Linda's ashes were scattered in Kintyre. A charitable trust was formed which raised funds in the local community and the garden was created within a sheltered space designed as part of Burnet's 19th Century Scots Renaissance building. The garden provides a quiet haven for rest and contemplation, with its centrepiece a life-size bronze statue of Linda donated by Sir Paul and sculpted by Jane Robbins.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2384099.stm
http://lindasgarden.co.uk/historyofkintyre.htm

Liz Lochhead

Artist:
Unknown

Date erected:
4 May 2002

Place:
Edinburgh Park Edinburgh

Commissioner:
Unknown

Scottish poet and playwright Liz Lochhead was born in 1947, in Motherwell, Lanarkshire. She studied at the Glasgow School of Art and taught art at schools in Glasgow and Bristol. She was Writer in Residence at Edinburgh University (1986-7) and Writer in Residence at the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1988.

This signed bronze portrait bust, on Crossland Hill sandstone pillar, was unveiled on 4 Apil 2002.

http://womenofscotland.org.uk/memorials/bust-liz-lochhead-edinburgh-park

Jean Armour

Artist:
unknown

Date erected:
1 Apr 2002

Place:
Mauchlin East Ayreshire Scotland

Commissioner:
unknown

Jean Armour (1765-1834), ‘Bonnie Jean’ the wife of Robert Burns, inspired his poetry and was also known as the ‘Belle of Mauchline’. Armour was born in Mauchline and the couple were married there. This bronze statue was unveiled in 2002. No specific date in 2002 available so 1/04 entered until info provided.

Photo: © Copyright Leslie Barrie and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

'Spirit of Jarrow'

Artist:
Graham Ibbeson

Date erected:
5 Oct 2001

Place:
Viking Centre, Jarrow

Commissioner:
Morrison's supermarket

'Spirit of Jarrow', Viking Centre, Jarrow
A bronze sculpture by Graham Ibbeson (2001) to commemorate the 65th anniversary of the Jarrow March (1936). The work was commissioned by Morrison's supermarket and stands near the entrance LinkExternal link
The protest march to London against unemployment and extreme poverty in north-east England was 280 miles and took 22 days. Despite the statue, only fit men were allowed to participate, although it was organised and accompanied by Jarrow MP, Ellen Wilkinson ('Red Ellen')
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tees-37617566

Fisher Jessie

Artist:
Andy Scott

Date erected:
1 Jan 2001

Place:
Peterhead

Peterhead town centre; ‘Fisher Jessie’ sculpture. Created by Andy Scott,
‘Fisher Jessie’ celebrates the lives of women in the fishing community. From the Gutting Quines who followed the herring fleet from Orkney to Yarmouth, to the wives and mothers who kept the home, baited lines, mended nets, carried their men onto the boats to keep their feet dry, walked miles to sell the catch and faced the daily fear that the sea could make them a widow before nightfall. his statue was erected in 2001. No date given so 1st Jan is a place holder until a date is submitted.
https://www.visitscotland.com/info/see-do/fisher-jessie-statue-p2304211

Elizabeth Crichton

Artist:
Sculptor: Bill Scott (1935-2012)

Date erected:
1 May 2000

Place:
Location: Crichton Campus, Dumfries, Scotland.

Commissioner:
unknown

Elizabeth Crichton (1779-1862) was a philanthropist, who founded the Crichton Royal Hospital in Dumfries. She had wanted to open a university, but was unable to obtain permission and instead founded a mental hospital, which delivered treatment that was very advanced for the time. Ironically, today the hospital estate is a university campus. This bronze memorial statue standing on a stone disc, which the sculptor, Bill Scott based on a painting of 1870, was unveiled in May 2000.
Photo:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki

Grandmother and Child

Artist:
Alan Wilson Extant Design,

Date erected:
15 Jul 1996

Place:
the Boulevard, Blackburn Lancashire

Commissioner:
unknown

Bronze statue of a grandmother and child on the Boulevard, Blackburn
Originally controversial when commissioned in 1996, it became a honeypot for visitors, especially mums and dads with children. They, and many locals, wanted to be photographed next to the statue. Council regeneration boss Maureen Bateson said: “The statue is a well recognised feature on the Boulevard and we want to put it into storage to ensure it doesn’t get damaged while the development is underway. It will be given pride of place in the new public realm space once it is completed”

Joanna “Jack” Crookston

Artist:
David Annand

Date erected:
1 Sep 1995

Place:
Tranent Civic Square East Lothian

Commissioner:
unknown

This statue of Joanna “Jack” Crookston in Civic Square in the East Lothian village of Tranent is a rarity, as few statues to named women stand in Scotland. Born in Gladsmuir in 1768, she lived at a time when many British soldiers were losing their lives on the battlefields of Europe. When the Militia Act was passed in 1797 to allow a conscription ballot to take 6,000 Scots – many of them men from poor families who needed them for their economic survival – the miners of Tranent resisted. A recruitment squad sent to the village was met by a defiant and brave 29-year-old Jackie, beating a drum and chanting: “Nae militia”, a band of protesters behind her. As the troops tried to disperse the crowd she is said to have declared she “didna care a pin though she were cut in halves, she wad hae nae militia.” It was to be the last action of her courageous young life. In what became known as The Massacre of Tranent troops mercilessly cut down men, women, and children – Jackie among them.
She is remembered in the memory of the town she gave her life to defend.
Designed by David Annand, it was unveiled in September 1995
Photo;https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Crookstone

Flora Thompson

Artist:
Sculptor: Philip Jackson (b.1944)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1995

Place:
Location: Liphook Library, Hampshire.

Flora Thompson (1846-1947), postal worker, novelist and poet, best known for her trilogy, Lark Rise to Candleford, much of her writing is autobiographical. She lived in Liphook. Her portrait bust in bronze was unveiled in 1981 outside the Sorting Office, then after being vandalised, it was recast and re-sited inside Liphook Library in 1995. exact date unknown
Photo:http://www.johnowensmith.co.uk/flora/pics2.htm

Dorothy L. Sayers

Artist:
Sculptor: John Doubleday (b.1947)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1994

Place:
Location: Newland Street, Witham, Essex.

Commissioner:
unknown

Dorothy L. Sayers (1893-1957) was a crime writer, poet, essayist, literary critic, linguist and a Christian humanist. She is known for her creation of the fictional amateur sleuth, Peter Wimsey. She was fond of cats and the bronze statue, set on a low stone plinth, shows her accompanied by her cat, Blitz. Sayers lived for many years in Witham and the statue is sited opposite her house and the Library. It was unveiled in 1994.exact date unknown.
photo:https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk

Unknown Women Worker

Artist:
Louise Walsh

Date erected:
1 Jan 1992

Place:
Great Victoria Street Belfast

Commissioner:
unknown

The Monument to the Unknown Woman Worker is a 1992 sculpture by Louise Walsh in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The sculpture is located on the city's Great Victoria Street adjacent to the Europa Hotel. It is cast in bronze and features two working-class women with symbols of women's work embedded on the surfaces.
Photo;https://en.wikipedia.org

Katie Ashbridge

Artist:
Laura Lian

Date erected:
1 Nov 1991

Place:
Entrance to Sports Complex, Malvern College, Malvern, Worcestershire.

Commissioner:
Kevan and Penny Ashbridge

Katie Ashbridge
Awaiting image
Katie attended Malvern College then St Edmund Hall, Oxford, but died tragically young of a brain haemorrhage at the age of twenty-five. She was a volunteer at a Quest Overseas project in Peru, where she taught sport, art, music and theatre, following her death a fund established in her name was used to provide better living conditions for disadvantaged children and single mothers in that community.
A keen sportswoman, the statue is of her as a fourteen year old playing Netball.

Clementine Churchill, Baroness Spencer-Churchill GBE(1885-1977)

Artist:
Sculptor: Oscar Nemon (1906-1985)

Date erected:
13 Nov 1990

Place:
Location: Chartwell, Kent.

Commissioner:
Contributors to the Churchill Statue Fund

Clementine Churchill, Baroness Spencer-Churchill GBE(1885-1977), the wife of Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965) was a life peer in her own right. Their marriage was close in spite of the stress of politics. The sculptor of this work, Oscar Nemon, is known for his series of sculptures of Sir Winston and both the Churchills admired his talent for portraiture. The wording around its base records that it was ‘Presented by Contributors to the Churchill Statue Fund to mark the 50th Anniversary of his becoming Prime Minister in 1940 and the 25th Anniversary of his death. Unveiled by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, President of The National Trust, on 13 November 1990.’
Photo;www.waymarking.com

Agatha Christie

Artist:
Carol Van Den Boom-Cairns

Date erected:
5 Nov 1990

Place:
Palk Street, on the Agatha Christie Mile, Torquay

Commissioner:
Not known

Agatha Christie was born in Torquay in 1890, and the English Riviera celebrated her centenary with the creation of a hand-crafted bronze bust in her likeness. The bust sits on Palk Street, on the Agatha Christie Mile, and close to the beautiful Edwardian Pavilion where her first husband Archie Christie proposed to her following a Wagner concert.

Created by Dutch sculptor Carol Van Den Boom-Cairns, it is the only one anywhere in the world, and was unveiled by her daughter, Rosalind Hicks.

The Agatha Christie Mile runs along Torquay seafront between the Imperial and Grand Hotels and features a number of landmarks signifcant in the author’s life and works. For more Agatha Christie sites, explore the Agatha Christie Literary Trail through the English Riviera and South Devon, which reveals the inspirations she took from the local area and featured in her novels.

Diana Dors

Artist:
JOHN Clinch

Date erected:
2 Aug 1987

Place:
Cineworld west Swindon

Popular 1950's film actress, born in Swindon.

Dolly Peel

Artist:
Sculptor: Billy Gofton (b.1945)

Date erected:
1 Apr 1987

Place:
Location: River Drive near the junction with Palatine Street, facing the river Tyne, South Shields, Tyne and Wear.

Commissioner:
Reginald Peel

(1782-1857) was a South Shields fishwife and smuggler in the 1800s, who protected sailors from the press gangs. Her activities were discovered, but she was pardoned and given work nursing sick sailors. She became a local heroine and later published poetry. The statue was commissioned by her great-great-great grandson Reginald Peel and was based on a surviving photograph. Made of ciment fondu, the statue was unveiled in April 1987.
Photo:https://en.wikipedia.org

Woman And Child

Artist:
Anne Davidson

Date erected:
22 Jul 1986

Place:
Festival Square

Commissioner:
Unknown

Anne Davidson’s anonymous African Woman and Child, unveiled in Festival Square in 1986 small sculpture which marks Edinburgh’s stand against apartheid. Unveiled 22 July 1986
Photo;http:www.eyeonedinburgh.net

George Eliot

Artist:
John Letts

Date erected:
15 Apr 1986

Place:
Nuneaton town centre

Commissioner:
George Eliot Fellowship

The statue of the author was made by John Letts in 1986, on a commission by the George Eliot Fellowship.

Platforms Piece

Artist:
Kevin Atherton

Date erected:
1 Jan 1986

Place:
Brixton overground station London

Commissioner:
unknown

Brixton Station (the overhead station, not the underground) holds one of London’s most important works of art connected to black history. Here, on the platforms, you’ll always find at least two passengers waiting for a train. The life-size, bronze sculptures, collectively known as Platforms Piece, are the work of Kevin Atherton, and have stood on the station since 1986 (a third is currently undergoing restoration). The statues were modelled on local residents Peter Lloyd, Joy Battick and Karin Heistermann. It’s thought that they are the first statues of black people in Britain, and as such they’ve been given listed status by Historic England.
The date of erection is 1986 but no month or day given so 1st Jan is a place holder until a date is supplied.

Platforms Piece

Artist:
Kevin Atherton

Date erected:
1 Jan 1986

Place:
Brixton overground station London

Commissioner:
unknown

Brixton Station (the overhead station, not the underground) holds one of London’s most important works of art connected to black history. Here, on the platforms, you’ll always find at least two passengers waiting for a train. The life-size, bronze sculptures, collectively known as Platforms Piece, are the work of Kevin Atherton, and have stood on the station since 1986 (a third is currently undergoing restoration). The statues were modelled on local residents Peter Lloyd, Joy Battick and Karin Heistermann. It’s thought that they are the first statues of black people in Britain, and as such they’ve been given listed status by Historic England.
The date of erection is 1986 but no month or day given so 1st Jan is a place holder until a date is supplied.

Dame Margot Fonteyn, as Ondine

Artist:
Sculptor: Nathan David FRBS (1930-2017)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1980

Place:
Location: Outside Watson House, London Road, Reigate, Surrey.

Commissioner:
her international fans.

Dame Margot Fonteyn, DBE (1919-1991), prima ballerina. The statue depicts her as the water sprite, Ondine, which was her favourite role. She was professionally paired for some years with the Russian dancer, Rudolf Nureyev. Fonteyn was President of the Royal Academy of Dancing. The bronze was unveiled by Fonteyn herself in 1980, it was commissioned by her international fans. Fonteyn was born in Reigate.
exact date unknown so 1/1 used until more info provided.
photo;https://en.wikipedia.org

Catherine Booth

Artist:
George Edward Wade (1853-1933)

Date erected:
1 Apr 1979

Place:
Mile End Road, London E1.

Commissioner:
the women of the US Salvation Army

Catherine Booth (1829-1890), co-founder of the Salvation Army with her husband William. This bronze cast of the statue of Booth in Denmark Hill was donated by the women of the US Salvation Army to mark the Army’s 150th anniversary.No precise date given so 1/1 used until more info provided.
photo TBH.

Dolores Ibarruri ‘La Pasionaria’,

Artist:
Sculptor: Arthur Dooley (1929-1994)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1979

Place:
Location: On the banks of the Clyde between Jamaica Street and Howard Street, Glasgow, Scotland.

Commissioner:
the International Brigade Association of Scotland

Dolores Ibarruri (1895-1989), activist, who fought for the Republican cause against Franco in the Spanish Civil War 1936-39. She was known as ‘La Pasionaria’, (the Passionflower). Commissioned by the International Brigade Association of Scotland as a memorial to the 2,100 British volunteers who fought for the Republican cause in the Spanish Civil War. The memorial has an inscription dedicated to the 534 volunteers who died, 65 of whom were from Glasgow. The plinth bears Ibarruri’s slogan ‘better to die on your feet than live forever on your knees.’ Erected in 1979, the statue was created from scrap iron and fibreglass and fell into disrepair, it was restored in 2010.
Exact date unknown so 1/1 used.
Photo:http://womenofscotland.org.uk/memorials/la-pasionaria

Kore, a real life teenager

Artist:
Sculptor: Betty Rea (1904-1965)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1975

Place:
Location: High Street, Harlow, Essex.

Commissioner:
Harlow Art Trust and Harlow Development Corporation for Old Harlow

Kore, a real life teenager, is skilfully captured by the sculptor, Betty Rea, who conveys languid teen boredom tinged perhaps with a hint of irritation. The bronze statue dates from 1973. It was purchased in 1975 by the Harlow Art Trust and Harlow Development Corporation for Old Harlow to celebrate the European Council Architectural Heritage Award for Old Harlow. It was unveiled in 1975 by Sir Thomas Monnington, President of the Royal Academy. (exact date unknown so 1/1 used)
Photo:https://realessex.blogspot.com/2011/04/kore-by-betty-rea

Amy Johnson CBE

Artist:
Sculptor: Harry Ibbetson

Date erected:
18 Jun 1974

Place:
Location: Prospect Street, In front of shopping centre, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire.

Commissioner:
Amy Johnson Memorial Committee

Amy Johnson CBE (1903-1941), pioneering aviator, first woman to fly solo from England to Australia. The statue in Portland stone on a concrete base was erected by the Amy Johnson Memorial Committee on 18 June 1974 The original Amy Johnson statue on Prospect Street in Hull. Photo Steven Craven geograph.co.uk creative commons.

Lady Wulfrun

Artist:
Sculptor: Sir Charles Wheeler KCVO CBE PRA (1892 –1974)

Date erected:
1 Apr 1974

Place:
Location: St Peter's Church, Wolverhampton, West Midlands.

Commissioner:
unknown

Lady Wulfrun (d.after 994) was an Anglo-Saxon noble woman and landowner with several estates in Staffordshire. She was granted a charter for Hēatūn, Anglo-Saxon for ‘high or prinicpal farm of enclosure’ by Aethelred II (Aethelred the Unready) in 985. She endowed a collegiate church there in 994, which is the site of St Peter’s Church where this bronze statue stands. It was erected in 1974 to celebrate the centenary of the Express and Star Newspaper. Lady Wulfrun is depicted holding the charter, a scroll with a large seal attached, which granted land to the monastery at Hēatūn. An extract from the charter is inscised into the steps below. After this generous donation, the town took on the name of its benefactor and became known as ‘Wulfrun Heantun, By 1070 it was known as Wolverenehamptonia, which is now the city of Wolverhampton. Lady Wulfrum is therefore regarded as the founder of Wolverhampton.
Photo: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wulfrun

Mother and Child

Artist:
Robert Thomas

Date erected:
1 Jan 1974

Place:
Blackburn Lancashire

Commissioner:
John Laing ( Developers)

This Blackburn town centre landmark was taken into storage when major regeneration work got underway in 2007. The Mother and Child monument in Lord Square was created by Welsh sculptor Robert Thomas in 1974. Thomas, who died in 1999, was commissioned by developers John Laing to create the Mother and Child statue at a cost of £2,000. The statue was given as a gift to Blackburn with Darwen Council by The Mall. The Robert Thomas sculpture was returned to a new position in Cardwell Place in July 2012.
Blackburn councillor Dave Harling said he was "delighted" it was returning to the town. Mr Harling said "people have been asking about when it would be returning so it is fantastic news that it will be taking pride of place in our new town centre scheme"
photo;https://www.bbc.co.uk

Pocahontas

Date erected:
1 Jan 1958

Place:
Gravesend

Pocahontas is said to have saved the life of the colony leader of Jamestown colony in North America , Capt John Smith, by pleading with her people to spare him. She later converted to Christianity, married another settler and became Rebecca Rolfe.

Her story was learned by generations of schoolchildren as a tale of simple heroism and was made into a successful Disney animated movie. But more recently it has been interpreted as an example of the disastrous encounters between her people and the colonisers.

Pocahontas was mortally ill when she was taken ashore at Gravesend after a propaganda tour to England to raise money for the struggling colony. She may have died of tuberculosis, or another western disease such as flu to which her people had no immunity, and she was probably only 23.

The Grade II-listed statue of Pocahontas in Gravesend, Kent, is having its status updated 400 years after she died on English soil.

Maev Kennedy
March 2017
Pocahontas statue in Gravesend relisted 400 years after her ...
www.theguardian.com › Arts › Heritage
Photo www.stgeorgesgravesend.org.uk

Amelia Opie

Artist:
Sculptor: Z. Leon Designer: J.P. Chaplin

Date erected:
1 Jan 1956

Place:
Location: Above shop façade, 6 Opie Street, Norwich, Norfolk.

Commissioner:
unknown

Amelia Opie (1769-1853) was a novelist, poet, radical and philanthropist. She was associated with the Godwin Circle and was friends with William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft. Her political thought was influenced by the French Revolution. In 1798, she married the artist John Opie in London and continued to write. She is best known for her novel ‘Adeline Mowbray’ (1804). When John Opie died in 1807, she returned to her father’s house in Norwich and lived close by where the statue has been erected in Opie Street. This statue, which depicts her in Quaker dress, was carved in wood and then cast in artificial stone.
photo:https://norfolkwomeninhistory.com

The Bronte sisters,

Artist:
Sculptor: Jocelyn Horner (1902–1973)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1951

Place:
Location: Outside the Parsonage Museum, Haworth, West Yorkshire.

Commissioner:
unknown

The Bronte sisters, this bronze group represents the three sisters, Charlotte (1816-1855), Emily (1818-1848) and Anne (1820-1849), who were all novelists and poets. They first published under the androgenous pseudonyms of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell, because the prejudices of the time would have disapproved of the publication of their works had they been known to be women. Once they achieved success they admitted to the pseudonyms. In this sculture the sisters are shown walking together and now appear to do so in the garden at the Haworth Parsonage, where they lived together with their father, who was perpetual curate of the parish. Commissioned in 1950, the sculpture is dated the following year. It was previously housed at Leeds City Art Gallery.
No exact date given so 1/1 used until more info provided
Photo;https://commons.wikimedia.org

Edith S. Kerrison

Artist:
Sculptor: Christine Gregory

Date erected:
1 Jan 1936

Place:
Location: Outside the Public Library, The Grove, Stratford, West Ham, E.15

Commissioner:
‘ERECTED BY MANY FRIENDS IN MEMORY OF A LIFE OF SERVICE TO OTHERS’.

Edith S. Kerrison (1850-1934) was a nurse and then hospital matron. A member of the Executive of the Women’s Labour League, Kerrison was the first woman to serve on West Ham Council. She was later offered the mayoralty but refused the role because of her age. She championed women and children. This memorial, dated 1936, was erected in the same year and this was also somewhat bizarrely, since she was dead, the year in which she was made a honorary freeman of the borough of West Ham. The memorial comprises a bronze bas relief with her portrait medallion in the centre and young children playing on either side. The relief is mounted on a stone plinth inscribed on the front ‘ERECTED BY MANY FRIENDS IN MEMORY OF A LIFE OF SERVICE TO OTHERS’. A further inscription on the back is badly eroded.
https://www.londonremembers.com/memorials/edith-s-kerrison

Emmeline Pankhust

Artist:
Luther George Walker

Date erected:
1 May 1930

Place:
outside Houses of Parliament London

One of the leaders of the Suffragette movement who won the first right to vote for some women. Made in 1930 but moved to present location in 1958.

Louisa Brandreth Aldrich-Blake

Artist:
Edwin Lutyens/Arthur George Walker

Date erected:
8 Jun 1926

Place:
Tavistock Square London WC1

Commissioner:
unknown

Britains first female surgeon.Dean of the London (Royal Free Hospital) School of Medicine for Women, 1914 - 1925, Consulting Surgeon Royal Free Hospital, 1919 - 1925, Surgeon to the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital, 1895 - 1925.

Edith Cavel

Artist:
Sir George Frampton, R.A., P.R.B.S. (1860-1928)

Date erected:
20 Mar 1920

Place:
St Martin's Place, London WC2

Commissioner:
Committee including the Mayor of London

A British World War 2 nurse from Norfolk. In addition to nursing soldiers from both sides without distinction, she assisted some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium and was executed by the Nazis. The inscription reads: "Edith Cavell // Brussels // Dawn // October 12th 1915 // Patriotism is not enough // I must have no hatred or // bitterness for anyone."

Edith Cavell

Artist:
Sculptor: Henry Alfred Pegram RA (1862-1937)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1918

Place:
Location: Grounds of Norwich Cathedral, Norwich, Norfolk. (Moved to current location 1993) from where?

Commissioner:
unknown

Edith Cavell (1865-1915), nurse, bronze memorial bust, stone plinth, the soldier seems to take rather more prominence than Edith herself. Designed 1915, unveiled 1918.
exact date not known so 1/1 used until more info provided.

Margaret MacDonald

Artist:
Richard Reginald Goulden

Date erected:
27 Aug 1914

Place:
Lincoln's Inn Fields London WC2

Commissioner:
her husband Ramsay MacDonald(?)

She was very active in trying to improve the lives of female industrial workers. She joined the Women's Industrial Council in 1894, publishing her investigations into home working in London in 1897, and helping to produce a series of studies on women workers. She was also heavily involved in the National Union of Women Workers. The house in Lincoln's Inn Fields thus became "a workshop of social plan and effort" (MacDonald 185). Her "heart went out in fellowship to her fellow-women & in love to the children of the people whom she served as a citizen and helped as a sister."

Florence Nightingale

Artist:
Arthur George Walker

Date erected:
5 Aug 1914

Place:
St James's, London

Florence Nightingale was a nurse who tended the wounded British troops in the Crimean war. She was known as " the lady with the lamp"

Florence Nightingale

Artist:
Sculptor: Lady Feodora Gleichen (1861-1922), the first female member of the Royal Society of British Sculptors (RBS)

Date erected:
1 Jun 1914

Place:
Location: Outside Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, facing London Road, Derby.

Commissioner:
Duke of Devonshire, President of the Governors of the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary (DRI).

Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) was celebrated for her nursing work during the Crimean War and was the founder of modern nursing. She is depicted as the ‘Lady with the Lamp’ walking through the wards of the Scutari Hospital with her famous lamp. The commission for the Memorial was initiated by the Duke of Devonshire, President of the Governors of the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary (DRI). In 1860 the DRI was rebuilt due to high mortality rates, along lines suggested by Nightingale. Her family lived in Derbyshire after returning from Florence. The white marble statue stands on a pedestal with a backscreen of Darley Dale stone; it was erected in June 1914 and is listed Grade II.
Photo:https://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk

Elizabeth Gaskell

Artist:
Sculptor: after Hamo Thornycroft (1850-1925)

Date erected:
1 Apr 1913

Place:
Location: Gaskell Memorial Tower, King Street, Knutsford , Cheshire.

Commissioner:
unknown

Elizabeth Gaskell (1810-1865), Victorian novelist, biographer and writer of short stories. Gaskell lived in Knutsford with her aunt and later was married there. Her portrait bust is in a niche on Gaskell Memorial Tower. It is a copy of a bust made in 1897 by Hamo Thornycroft (1850-1925), now at the University of Manchester Library, which itself was a copy of a plaster bust by David Dunbar (1792-1866), which was executed c.1829. The marble (?) bust was in place on the Tower by 1913.
Photo;https://www.waymarking.com

Florence Nightingale

Artist:
Unknown

Date erected:
1 Sep 1912

Place:
East Street Derby

Commissioner:
Unknown

The former Boots building in East Street (Image: Derby Telegraph)
The building was built in 1912 and features a statue of Miss Nightingale alongside other historic figures associated with the city’s industrial heritage including Jedediah Strutt, whose ancestor built the original hospital on the London Road site in 1810.
Date of erection Unknown so a guess.
Photo;https://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk

Elizabeth Fry

Artist:
Sculptor: Alfred Briscoe Drury (1856-1944)

Date erected:
1 Jan 1912

Place:
Location: Grand Hall of the Old Bailey, London EC4.

Elizabeth Fry (1780-1845), prison and social reformer, and philanthropist. This marble statue was erected in 1912 in the Old Bailey, which is the site of the former Newgate Prison.
The sculptor was Alfred Briscoe Drury R.A. (1856-1944) it was funded by an anonymous benefactor. It originally stood at Newgate Gaol, as Elizabeth had campaigned for better prison conditions. Elizabeth Fry (1780-1845) nee Gurney was born in Norwich to a comfortable family, she married Joseph Fry who was a partner in Gurney's Bank. She was known as the 'angle of the prisons' for her work on prison reforms. The statue shows her in her Quaker bonnet. exact date unknown so 1/1 used until more info provided
Photo;www.british-towns.net

Annie, Lady Jerningham

Artist:
Sculptor: O. P. PennacchiniDesigners: Sir Hubert Jerningham and Walter Ingram

Date erected:
1 Jan 1908

Place:
Location: Bankhill, Marygate, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland.

Commissioner:
unknown

Annie, Lady Jerningham (1850-1902), philanthropist. Her memorial, a white marble statue on grey granite base, signed: O. P. Penachini, dated 1906, was erected 1908. Listed Grade II. For further details see Historic England and Paul Usherwood, Jeremy Beach and Catherine Morris, Public Sculpture of North-East England, LUP 2000, pp. 14-15.
Photo;https:commons.wikimedia.org Creative Commons.

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands

Artist:
Sculptor: John Cassidy (1860-1939)

Date erected:
9 Dec 1907

Place:
Location: Reading Room, John Rylands Library, Manchester.

Commissioner:
unknown

Enriqueta Augustina Rylands (1843-1908), a philanthropist, was the third wife of the wealthy cotton manufacturer, John Rylands. After his death, she spent 20 years and around two million pounds of his fortune building the John Rylands Library in his memory. She loved architecture, art and books. The Library was designed at her request by the architect, Basil Champney (1842-1935). It rivalled the university libraries of Oxford and Cambridge. When it was inaugurated on 6 October 1899, the anniversary of her marriage, the Manchester Corporation gave her the Freedom of the City. She was the first woman to receive this honour. Mrs Rylands commissioned a Seravezza marble statue of her husband for the Reading Room from the sculptor, John Cassidy in 1894, which was installed when the Library opened. Supporters of the Library commissioned her statue from the same sculptor, also in Seravezza marble, as a pair to her husband’s. This stands at the other end of the Library facing him and was unveiled on 9 December 1907, shortly before her death.
photo:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enriqueta_Augustina_Rylands

Isabella Elder

Artist:
Sculptor: Archibald McFarlane Shannan (1850-1915)

Date erected:
13 Oct 1906

Place:
Location: Elder Park, Govan, Glasgow, Scotland.

Commissioner:
unknown

Isabella Elder (1828-1905) was a benefactress and philanthropist, who promoted education, especially among women and was concerned with the welfare of the people of Govan. She built the Elder Free Library, a School of Domestic Economy, the Cottage Hospital and a Nurses’ Training Home. She created Elder Park, where this statue is sited. The bronze statue shows her in academic robes on a granite plinth. The statue, unveiled on 13 October 1906, was erected by public subscription. It is very rare to find a statue to a non-royal woman at this period.

Granite cutters (to Shannan's patterns): DH & J. Newall of Dalbeattie Founder: J.W. Singer & Sons, Frome, Dorset
Phot; macedonboy.www.tripadvisor.co.uk

Florence Nightingale

Artist:
Unknown

Date erected:
1 Jan 1904

Place:
Former Nightingale Maternity Home, Trinity Street

Commissioner:
Unknown

A statue of the nurse is above the front door of the building, where babies were delivered between 1904 until the 1970s. Initially, it was set up as a private nursing and midwifery hospital run by the Royal Derby and Derbyshire Nursing and Sanitary Association.

From 1948 it operated as an NHS maternity institute - the ‘Nightingale Home for Maternity Cases’. In the 1980s, it became a hospice for the Nightingale Macmillan Unit, which has since moved to the Royal Derby Hospital. The front of the building is listed
The date of erection is a guess.
Photo;https://www.derbytelegraph.co.uk/

Georgina, Baroness Mount-Temple

Artist:
Sculptor: Arthur George Walker (1861-1939)

Date erected:
20 Oct 1903

Place:
Location: Babbacombe Downs, Torquay, Devon.

Commissioner:
unknown

Georgina, Baroness Mount-Temple (1822-1901) was a philanthropist, who spoke out passionately against cruelty and injustice. An animal rights campaigner, she was a founder of the Anti-Vivisection League and one of the first patrons of the RSPCA. She is depicted with a bird on her wrist and it is said fresh flowers have been put in her hands every day for over 100 years. Her bronze statue is on a fountain; the basin and fountain are of Trusham greenish-black basalt and the pedestal stands on a base of Ashburton marble, unveiled October 1903.
Photo;https://www.devonlive.com

Sarah Siddons

Artist:
Leon-Joseph Chavalliaud / Chavaillaud

Date erected:
3 May 1897

Place:
Paddington Green, London W2, Westminster

Commissioner:
unknown

Actress. Born Brecon, Wales - Unveiled by Sir Henry Irving who pointed out that, unless you count Shakespeare, this is the first statue of an actor erected in London. Mrs Siddons lived at Westbourne Green 1805 - 1817 (a little further along the Westway, towards the west) and is buried in nearby St Mary’s Churchyard.

Flora MacDonald

Artist:
Andrew Davidson

Date erected:
6 Oct 1896

Place:
Inverness castle

Commissioner:
Captain J. Henderson MacDonald of Caskieben, and of the 78th Highlanders."

Flora Macdonald was the young woman who helped Bonnie Prince Charlie escape from Scotland after the Jacobites were routed at the Battle of Culloden in 1746. This monument to her stands on Castle Hill, Inverness, in front of the Sheriff Court, high on Castle Hill, Inverness, so that, as John Gifford says, Flora is shown gazing "down the Great Glen" — the valley of the River Ness. According to the "Inverness City Trail," the statue of the Jacobite heroine was paid for” by the generosity of Captain J. Henderson MacDonald of Caskieben, and of the 78th Highlanders. It is by Andrew Davidson (1841-1925). As well as an inscription of Flora Macdonald's name in the granite pedestal, there is a bronze plaque, in the shape of a shield, with a quotation in both Gaelic and English. Dr Johnson met Flora on the Isle of Skye in 1773, during his tour of the Highlands, and was much taken with her: "The preserver of Prince Charles Edward Stuart will be mentioned in history and if courage and fidelity be virtues, mentioned with honour." She was, says James Boswell when recording the meeting, "a little woman, of a genteel appearance, and uncommonly mild and well bred. To see Dr Samuel Johnson, the great champion of the English Tories, salute Miss Flora Macdonald in the isle of Sky, was a striking sight"
http://www.victorianweb.org/sculpture/davidson/1.html
http://womenofscotland.org.uk/memorials/statue-elizabeth-grant

Sister Dora

Artist:
Francis John Williamson

Date erected:
5 Apr 1886

Place:
Walsall

Commissioner:
the People of Walsall

Sister Dora was a 19th-century Anglican nun and a nurse in Walsall, West Midlands.She dedicated her life to nursing, including a smallpox epidemic. In 1886 the people of Walsall paid to have a statue of Dora erected, of which they are all still immensely proud. 40,000 people were there for the unveiling and in the 1950's people paid again to replace the statue with a new bronze copy, because the original marble statue had deteriorated. From time to time you will even find Dora wearing a red scarf, if Walsall FC are having a good run. She is a Walsall icon."
Photo;https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki

Dame Eleanor Allan

Artist:
unknown

Date erected:
1 Jan 1882

Place:
Location: West façade, College House, Northumberland Road, Newcastle, Tyne and Wear.

Commissioner:
unknown

(No Image available - do send one in! - or see https://pssauk.org/women/)
Dame Eleanor Allan (b.?- d.1708), founder of Dame Allan’s schools, figure in niche, white stone, erected c.1882.

Architect : R.J. Johnson (1832-1892)

Catherine Booth

Place:
Champion Park, Camberwell, London SE5

Affectionally remembered as " the Army Mother " she was a successful speaker who won many converts... and changed the attitude to female ministry ( previously frowned upon ), leading to it being approved of by The Salvation Army and a statement regarding sexual equality in ministry being published in The Salvation Army’s Orders and Regulations. For many Salvationists Catherine’s legacy is this success in advancing an expanded public role for women in Church life. Catherine is also celebrated for her commitment to social reform. She is known for her advocacy of better conditions and pay for women workers in London’s sweated labour, notably in the match making industry.